Knowledge Networking

I’ve been thinking for several years about Knowledge Networking. It’s not a term I invented, it’s been floating around as a meme for at least a decade or two. But recently it has started to resurface in my own work.

So what is a knowledge network? I define a knowledge network as a form of collective intelligence in which a network of people (two or more people connected by social-communication relationships) creates, organizes, and uses a collective body of knowledge. The key here is that a knowledge network is not merely a site where a group of people work on a body of information together (such as the wikipedia), it’s also a social network — there is an explicit representation of a social relationship within it. So it’s more like a social network than for example a discussion forum or a wiki.

I would go so far as to say that knowledge networks are the third-generation of social software. (Note this is based in-part on ideas that emerged in conversations I have had with Peter Rip, so this also his idea):

  • First-generation social apps were about communication (eg.
    messaging such as Email, discussion boards, chat rooms, and IM)
  • Second-generation social apps were about people and content (eg. Social networks, social media sharing, user-generated content)
  • Third-generation social apps are about relationships and knowledge  (eg. Wikis, referral networks, question and answer systems, social recommendation systems, vertical knowledge and expertise portals, social mashup apps, and coming soon, what we’re building at Radar Networks)

Just some thoughts on a Saturday morning…